Migration as a panacea to hate-speech

Scientific enlightenment and communication is enabling the universe to coalesce into one big global village from a diversity of cannibalistic Neanderthals and tribal internecine annihilators who could not suffer ‘foreigners’ among their pure genes. It is shocking then that in this day and age we continue to reel under the weight of tribal bigotry, racism and religious intolerance.

Many theories have been proposed as to the origin and status of world languages. The easiest and most generally accepted is the creation theory and the consequent diversification of language at the Tower of Babel. Since that language barrier human race murderously hobbles on.

Human anatomy is the same world over. Some may have longer noses, grey eyes and less colour in skin pigmentation while others may have shorter noses, more round heads, brown eyes and more skin colour, but they are all noses, eyes, skulls and skins with red blood and body organs performing similar functions. People may inhabit different topographies requiring different adaptations but the human composition is one.

It startles then, that a difference in phonetics inspires one individual to spite another and seek their extermination, modernity notwithstanding.

Globalisation has been achieved because certain individuals left the comfort of their natural habitat and ventured out to live under completely new and challenging climatic and social conditions.

It is argued that people who are native to a given locality may not fully exploit the resources therein as they may have become so accustomed to the natural arrangement of things. It requires the presence of a ‘foreigner’ to view the environment differently and ‘discover’ (new?) resources which the original dwellers were completely oblivious to.

No wonder early foreigners into Africa are credited with ‘discovering’ natural features like mountains, rivers, lakes and natural resources while the original inhabitants saw ‘nothing big’ in them. They came and exploited these resources for massive economic gain while natives traded in and gained very little from them.

Advancing that biblical narrative, excellence and success as a result of migration seem to be God-ordained. Apart from the dispersal at the Babel Tower, a man named Abraham is commanded to move away from the comfort of his native home to a land far away, where God goes on to greatly increase and bless him. His progeny Jacob moved even further to Egypt and kept migrating thereby becoming a mightily empowered nation. By World War II in which Hitler -due to environmental conditions and language- sought to annihilate them, they had spread the world over and influenced it greatly. A cult that started in their territory is today the world’s largest religion.

A person born Ouma Otieno in the shores of Lake Victoria should not grow up believing he is an ordained fisherman; Maina Mwangi should not believe he is a coffee/tea-picker designate; and neither should Kulet ole Kina nor Hamed Hamad believe they are dyed-in-the-wool pastoralists.
With the advantage of education individuals have opportunities to change their environments and move to new places where they can have greater social impact. Similarly they can welcome ‘foreigners’ from other environments who would impact in their own localities more and create new opportunities for locals.

It is time we moved and integrated to harness our diversity and bring out the best in us. The idea of ‘ancestral lands’ and ‘our people’ is pre-civilisation. All human beings are ‘our people’! Evidently we are not native to the geographies we inhabit. Junet Mohammed is a Kenyan Somali but MP for Suna East in Nyanza; Shakeel Shabbir and Abdul Rahim Dawood of Asian descent are MPs in Kisumu and Meru counties respectively.

It is pretty paleolithic of former Nairobi Mayor George Aladwa to suggest that ‘some Kenyans have to die’ so that one other Kenyan ascends to power. Does he include himself as one of those who should die or who should?

When Moses Kuria, Johnstone Muthama, Mutahi Ngunyi, and the others keep throwing tribal jibes at each other, they do not advance humanity but rather diminish it. They leave us wondering whether we have really evolved into modern scientific man or we are still boxed in our prehistoric selves.

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TIME TO CALL OUR POLITICIANS BLUFF!

Our politics have gone haywire, and because we are not exactly sure what our problem is we run around like headless chicken looking for salvation, finding none.

No, we know what our problem is, it is our politics; but we have placed politicians at the head, and because they cannot fix themselves, they are leading us in a wild goose chase. They funnel us to elections and referenda that solve nothing, but only ensure we remain busy running around behind them.

They also know the right cord to pick, tribe, this “us versus them” chorus. When that cord is strummed, we are fully tuned. Like the now famous vitendawili­ (riddles) sikio la kufa halisikii dawa (the ear of the dying knows no cure); once tribe is mentioned reason flies out the window.

Taking the calls for a referendum versus the County Governments (Amendment) Bill, 2013 the confusion is palpable.

The New Constitution 2010 envisaged that county governments would be run similar to the national government, not parallel or independent. Suddenly, governors want to be independent presidents.

Senators do not seem to understand their role. Upon taking office, they started competing with parliamentarians and threatening to pass bills to abolish each other’s House.

They have now turned to governors and governors do not have a choice in the matter. Why else would they propose more money to the devolved units through a ‘pesa mashinani’ referendum, then make themselves chairpersons of the County Development Boards, if not to tap the same money for themselves?

The New Constitution sought to deal with former president Moi’s loathed dictatorship. Once he left the scene, new forms of dictatorships have cropped up. Parliament and senate still wish to dictate what form of government we must have or what they must earn, and there is nothing we will do! Politicians can use tribal dictatorships to determine how we live our lives.

The public does not understand the difference in the roles of all these elected and nominated representatives or why they are even necessary. If it was to have their way, this referendum would be about a reduction in their numbers and/or a complete dissolution of one house. Politicians, though, won’t allow this question in the referendum.

One wonders what the national equivalent of the County Development Board is.

Any board that portends to advice the president at the national level is created by that president, be it the cabinet (the kitchen cabinet, too) or others like the National Economic & Social Council. He either chairs it himself or delegates the leadership to a chosen person.

The formation and constitution of county development boards is laudable but it should have been chaired by the governor still, as the county chief executive. The senator should have been a non-executive member then able to articulate the issues of the county at the national level, the senate.

All devolved funds should have been channeled to the board giving governors more than the forty per cent they are demanding. Senators, MCAs and MPs, as members, should concentrate on legislation while requiring that money is allocated to projects they have agreed upon in their respective areas of representation. They can also hold the governor to account, but in the current case they may have to impeach the senator!

We, the people demand a referendum, but we demand more to be allowed to formulate the question.

 

 

There is no question that there was need to create a County Development Board or whatever other advisory and consultative body deemed necessary, but the chairing of such a body should and ought to have gone to the governor or his appointee. Period.

The role of this board is worthy of applause, but there is also a lot of reorganization of our politics and government that is demanded. But it won’t happen any time soon. Follow me.

The creation of a board like this one is healthy for consultation and to ensure that there is actually no conflict between governors’ development agenda with that of MPs and their CDF and MCA with LATF and any other funds devolved into the county government.

But that then demands, and why not, that all money devolved into the county be put in the same kitty! This would actually show that governors have at their disposal more than the forty per cent they are demanding. There is then no need for a referendum!

The senators, the MCAs and the MPs would then have to surrender their funds and be left with their primary responsibility which is to legislate both at national and county level. As members of these boards, development would still follow what they recommend and there should be no fear that the governor will run away with the development and leave the other elected individual with no claim to development come elections!

The governor may even assign a given amount of money per MCA or MP so that a project of the MCA or MP, even Woman Rep and Senator is carried out within the development agenda of the county. Why can that not be done? Each one of them is either an elected or nominated representative of a key segment of society and should be accorded development funds for that sector or section.

The governor then becomes the executive at the county level; the secretary can be elected by the members of the board upon their first meeting. The senator should not be given any of these roles but would participate fully in the deliberations and then ably represent the aspirations of the county at the senate level.

Once there are issues of discussion as to the conduct of governors the senator would be a neutral arbiter. Where the senator is also chairing the county board and therefore authorizing the projects to be undertaken and how they are to be funded, how would they then hold the governors to account?

Apparently, devolution has truly been interfered with, but it is not by the national executive as those championing the referendum and crying foul would want us to believe. It has been usurped by the same senators who want a referendum to add money to the counties. Who knows, it will go a long way in lining their pockets!

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Kenya’s headless politics and more vitendawili

Our politics have gone haywire, and because we are not exactly sure what our problem(s) is(are) we are running around like headless chicken looking for salvation but finding none.

Oops! Let me rephrase. We know politics is our problem, but we have placed politicians at the head of our decision-making, and because they cannot fix themselves, they are leading us in a wild-goose-chase. They keep channeling us to referendums and elections that solve nothing apart from the fact that we remain behind them busy running around.

They have also known the right cord (Ah! that word again, Cord) the right cord to pick, tribe. The song is “Us versus them” and when that cord is strummed, we are fully tuned. Like the now-famous vitendawili­ (riddles) sikio la kufa halisikii dawa (the ear of the dying obeys no medicine), once tribe is mentioned the rest can go to hell.

It does not matter who says otherwise –if we take this as a starting point- the County Governments (Amendment) (No. 2). Bill, 2013 is wrong and based on wrong premise. Period.

Oh! The details therein are splendid, until, yes, you get to that small stuff of the chairmanship of the County Development Boards.

First things first. We have created, with our New Constitution 2010, a form of government that we do not seem to know or understand how it looks and/or how it is supposed to work.

At the enactment of the constitution, it was envisaged that the county governments thereby created would be run similarly to the national government (not parallel or independent). Suddenly, governors want to be independent presidents.

The people who do not seem to understand their role are the senators. No wonder upon taking office, they started competing with parliamentarians and threatening each other with which house is upper and more powerful and that one may as well pass a bill to abolish the other. With the tiff quieted, the senators seem to have turned to governors and now they want to be governors themselves.

Unfortunately, the governors were not given a choice in the matter. It is a case where senators create a bill to make themselves governors and there is nothing anyone can do. I have previously decried the fact that while we loathed the dictatorship of former president Moi and sought a new constitution to deal with him, once he left the scene, new forms of dictatorships have cropped in. Parliament and senate can now dictate what form of government we must have or what they must earn, and there is nothing we will do! One politician can use his/her tribe to dictate to us who should be elected where or not and who should live where or not, resulting tribal dictatorship.

One is tempted to ask, what is the national equivalent of the County Development Board? Who constitutes that board and how have they been selected into the board at national level?

Any body that portends to advice the president at the national level is created by that president, be it the cabinet (the kitchen cabinet too) or others like the National Economic & Social Council. He either chairs the body himself or delegates the leadership to a chosen person.

There is no question that there was need to create a County Development Board or whatever other advisory and consultative body deemed necessary, but the chairing of such a body should and ought to have gone to the governor or his appointee. Period.

The role of this board is worthy of applause, but there is also a lot of reorganization of our politics and government that is demanded. But it won’t happen any time soon. Follow me.

The creation of a board like this one is healthy for consultation and to ensure that there is actually no conflict between governors’ development agenda with that of MPs and their CDF and MCA with LATF and any other funds devolved into the county government.

But that then demands, and why not, that all money devolved into the county be put in the same kitty! This would actually show that governors have at their disposal more than the forty per cent they are demanding. There is then no need for a referendum!

The senators, the MCAs and the MPs would then have to surrender their funds and be left with their primary responsibility which is to legislate both at national and county level. As members of these boards, development would still follow what they recommend and there should be no fear that the governor will run away with the development and leave the other elected individual with no claim to development come elections!

The governor may even assign a given amount of money per MCA or MP so that a project of the MCA or MP, even Woman Rep and Senator is carried out within the development agenda of the county. Why can that not be done? Each one of them is either an elected or nominated representative of a key segment of society and should be accorded development funds for that sector or section.

The governor then becomes the executive at the county level; the secretary can be elected by the members of the board upon their first meeting. The senator should not be given any of these roles but would participate fully in the deliberations and then ably represent the aspirations of the county at the senate level.

Once there are issues of discussion as to the conduct of governors the senator would be a neutral arbiter. Where the senator is also chairing the county board and therefore authorizing the projects to be undertaken and how they are to be funded, how would they then hold the governors to account?

Apparently, devolution has truly been interfered with, but it is not by the national executive as those championing the referendum and crying foul would want us to believe. It has been usurped by the same senators who want a referendum to add money to the counties. Who knows, it will go a long way in lining their pockets!

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NEED FOR BALANCED HEADLINES

In the 1980s and early 90s, almost all newspaper headlines –at least all front pages- used to carry news about “His Excellency, the President …”. All the news bulletins on radio and television started with the same intro, “Mtukufu Rais …”. We were so sick and tired of this among other things that we sought political pluralism to liberate ourselves from the shackles of one-man-dictatorship and hero-worship.

With political pluralism we did not only extricate ourselves from this one-man-showmanship but got a free and independent media and media pluralism. We now have numerous media outlets that broadcast as they wish, sometimes making the line between public decorum and public order really stretched. We are now a free society.

Apparently, the same society that pursued liberation from “government oppression” seems to have replaced that with “opposition oppression”.

Almost all news headlines –most front-page news- and all main news bulletins are headlined with “opposition news”. It is either opposition politician Raila Odinga this or opposition party Cord that. When we have other headlines, they only depict government ineptitude, cluelessness and corruption.

While we have many challenges for which we demand and expect those in authority to take charge of, the very reason they campaigned for and were given those positions, we seem to also assume that everything the opposition says and does is sacrosanct. We do not demand the same level of responsibility from those ‘in authority’ outside of government. They can say anything and do anything, even if it borders on breaching the peace, because it is the government’s mandate to maintain law and order.

In many quarters, it is a crime to criticise Raila. On social media, the mere mention of the name, negatively, invites tomes of abuse, vitriol and ridicule. You only escape with your life because you are not within physical reach. Those who try to look at government positively are described as “see-no-evil, hear-no-evil, speak-no-evil” government sympathisers and at worst chauvinistic and parochial tribal sycophants.

One popular kitendawili (riddle) among the many that we have now become accustomed to says “Nyani haoni kundule”. One monkey will laugh at the ugly behind of another without noticing that their own behind is equally ugly and embarrassing. Opposition supporters do not see their own “see-no-evil, hear-no-evil, speak-no-evil” opposition sympathies and chauvinistic and parochial tribal sycophancy.

It is not the work of citizens to cheer on an underperforming government but they also have a responsibility. They cannot be whipped into ‘making the state ungovernable’ and then complain as the government struggles to govern.

If we did not wish to continue hearing about ‘his excellency the president …’ at every breath, it may also be prudent not to hear about ‘the opposition party this …’ or the ‘opposition leader that …’ at every turn. Or did we just wish to replace the one with the other?

It may be even more prudent to alternate the government and the opposition on our news. If the headline carries opposition news, the sub-headline should carry government news and the following day the vice versa. If the headline is on a different topic and a sub-headline seems to carry government news, another on the next column should carry opposition news. There is need to temper and balance what information is put out there.

The media should also endeavour to do one better. Whenever the government or the opposition makes certain claims, more so against one another, the media should go into the background and provide facts to put the claims in context. This would help the public in forming opinions about what is claimed, those who lay the claims and the truth.

In a media interview recently, the media was accused of not probing the Saba Saba information adequately and hence abetting national apprehension. Media is yet to come clean on the post-election debacle.

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Mr. President, You Cannot Superintend Over Economic Destruction and Hope to Heal It With 20% of Your Salary

While the President appears to be pontificating and foaming at the mouth about an unmanageable wage bill and salary cuts, some of his own pronouncements and his government’s policies are doing more harm to the economy than good.

His being not in good books with the west which is withholding about KES15 billion only adds to the pain he has to manage and should cause him more worry than slicing a mere 20% of his salary. The amount he might save from these cuts may only amount to a few hundred million shilling, which is a drop in the ocean compared to the billion shillings deficit. This gift from the west supports the NGO world, which is a major employer and distributor of wealth among many Kenyans, but even those are being vehemently fought.

There are moves now to re-change the constitution to remove various office holders that we now realize are redundant and unnecessary. We had not envisaged that when we passed the New Constitution, though we expected the provincial administration to be removed but has been retained.

Government wastefulness is also to blame for lack of revenue and must be curbed. Unnecessary and ludicrous allowances are being paid to various officers for doing what they already earn salaries to do.

However, it is the pronouncements and policy directives being issued left, right and centre that are ultimately doing us in. Take for instance the fact that Kenya Breweries Ltd, (EABL) a major employer and taxpayer has laid off a hundred employees. That may look insignificant and unnoticeable to many but considering that any one of them was a benefactor to around five other Kenyans, six hundred people have technically been orphaned.

This could be due to loss of revenue arising from Mututho laws and the (in)famous alcoblow.  Less and less people are drinking; they are drinking for less hours and drinking less beer in fear of being waylaid on their way home by some overzealous alcoblow police. In the circumstances, many opt just not to drink.

From my position, I should be celebrating, but I know too well that once you ask a prostitute to leave the only trade s/he knows, you should be able to direct them to an alternative source of income, otherwise after a day or two without ‘work’ and income, which means no interaction with ‘colleagues’ (man is a social animal) and no food on the table, they will revert to the only business they know.

By reducing drinking, we should be in a position to provide an alternative business model for EABL so as to help them employ even more Kenyans and pay more taxes to the government, and also make the business environment more conducive for increased activities. With these layoffs, how has the government helped reduce unemployment, a key promise of the jubilee government?

Just this week, the Deputy President announced that there will be no tea in government offices and worse still, the government will not be buying papers for the various offices it buys.

All the ingredients used to make these refreshments; tea, coffee, milk, sugar and whatever else that is served are ‘Made in Kenya’. That is reduced revenue to the suppliers of these items. It also means that those who can afford to buy from the local vendors and hotels will have to leave their offices ‘to go take tea’, implying time will be wasted, both by employees and those seeking their services as they will have to wait on queues for them to return from their ‘teas’ wherever they may have gone to search for them.

The government buys about 5 million newspapers every year throughout the country. At KES60.00 per paper, that translates to a loss of KES300 million to the newspaper industry. I see the media laying off staff, abetting unemployment further. I have a personal interest in this one.

Then, there is this night travel ban. When it was instituted, I applauded. I applauded because if you have a son or daughter who is prone to truancy, and you warn them once, and twice even thrice and they do not seem to heed your advice and correction, then you take the next available measures to ensure they hear, notice and heed your admonitions. Spanking is politically incorrect but it still popular. Grounding and denial of certain privileges has appeared as a suitable alternative where certain limitations are ensured “for a given period of time” depending on the misdemeanor in question. This is where I differ with the government.

I had hoped that the ban was for the festive period only! While it harmed a lot of business both for the transport industry and people who hoped to cash in on the period, there is no telling the number of lives that were saved, and probably have continued to be saved for as long as the ban stands. Nevertheless, it should have been to ‘teach a lesson’ to these truant drivers and vehicle owners, not kill business forever. It should have been a short term measure to a problem, as we look for the long term panacea. Alas! It has now become the cure all.

One also does not need to be a rocket scientist to know that when a road has 10000 vehicles plying it and there is a 10% accident rate, the number of accidents with be higher than when the same route has 2000 vehicles with the same 10% accident rate. The ban reduced the number of vehicles on the roads and therefore lowered the number of accidents, but apparently accidents are still with us, meaning there is something else fundamentally wrong, and that is what we should address. If it is still drunkardness among the drivers, or just poor driving skills or even poorly designed roads, lack of clear road signs and potholes, that is what we must address, and not kill business by killing transport and communication. This was a key tenet of the industrial revolution. To imagine a digital government in the 21st century that is taking us back to before speedy transport and communication was known is shocking indeed.

Recently we even heard the Nairobi County Police Commander Benson Kibue issue an edict for motorbike operators to ‘close shop’ by 8.00 pm, whereas it is between 3.00pm and 11 pm that their business is brisk. Before boda bodas became popular, crime was at an all-time high. Crime is reduced when people are gainfully engaged and proper crime prevention measures put in place. Did I hear that we are supposed to pursue a 24-hour economy? Pray tell, when such pronouncements are made, how do are they supposed to reduce crime?

Surely, matatus are hijacked in this city, left right centre, not once has evening matatus been banned and we are not under a curfew. Then again, how many times have people been attacked in their private cars -by people in other private cars, not motor bikes- and personal night travel has never been banned. Last time I checked, the boda bodas are manufactured complete with a headlight, meaning they can be used at night; Mr. Kibui seems not to know this. Oh! And while at it, I know a few friends who own and use a motorcycle as a personal transport system. Are we suggesting to them not to use them at night? If they have a friend, they should not ‘lift’ that friend home in the evening, as long they all have the right gear? Where are some of these policies from? It is the police, looking for the slightest hole to sink some corruption money through!

President Uhuru Kenyatta is saying the things that people need to hear when he speaks publicly, otherwise called populism. His policies, directives and reactionary orders from his government are doing the exact opposite. His salary, even if he refused to take the whole of it cannot sustain us or our economy. And if he is not getting his salary and a good one at that, how sure are we he is not supplementing through corrupt means? The same for his members of the executive?

Your Excellency Sir, get your salary and enjoy it. Only create policies that will enable more Kenyans earn a salary and do profitable business both during the day and during the night. Your responsibility is to ensure we are secure by day and by night; that our roads are smooth and well constructed to reduce accidents and that foreign investment is happening, whether from the East or the West. Micromanaging our lives, and determining what time we wake up or sleep is not the reason we elected you, Sir.

Please go ahead and roll out all the mega projects you promised and those you have initiated, including the laptops –if you can do it above board and you have the money. Otherwise you do not destroy the economy, enjoy you retreats, and then come around and tell us you need to lay us off to bring us development. Please visit Nigeria with an open mind, then come and  we have that National dialogue you are talking about ….

And we have not even discussed corruption!

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Uuuuuuuuuuiiii! Thieves! All of them are thieves!

I disagree with the senators on this one: Senators should not Chair County boards! Period.

Their role is oversight according to the constitution, and they should not change their role simply because they are lawmakers. How will they then query when there are problems in the counties? If they did not stop Wambora, who would have? If they themselves misappropriate funds, who will they be answerable to?

We are so used to a parliament that only agrees when thieving and on this one they are planning how to thief again. Kenyans please be on the look out, these guys do not have our welfare at heart, it is their stomachs they worry about. Right now, their fear is that governors are becoming too powerful and they will determine who will be elected to parliament and senate. If you want to be in parliament next elections, just be governor’s friend. To secure their fortunes MPs want to hijack the counties and put them in their pockets so that they get elected next time. They are afraid governors have too much money and as such, they will be uncontrollable.

Every senator or MP who votes to completely muzzle the governor while emancipating themselves should not see the inside of next parliament. Let them check governors and let governors check them at the local county level. Checkmate! What happened to checks and balances? MPS want the scales tipped in their favour. Governors should not steal, but Senators and MPs should? Oh! They are angles, I digressed …

Who is with me???

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Terrorists, I choose freedom!

Kenyans should learn not to spread fear but to spread Faith, Hope and Love. In life, there usually is nothing to fear but fear itself (Wilson Woodrow, American President)

Got this SMS:

“Fwd: UK’s Transport Secretary suspends all flights to and from United Kingdom to Kenya as from tonight 10.30p.m. GMT. Intelligence MI6 say threat level 5. Security alert: Avoid malls and crowded places today and tomorrow. There is a real and credible threat of a terror attack. Please share information. Commit Kenya to God.”

Friends. Telling people to avoid ‘malls” etc, is telling us not to go on with our lives and our business, become despondent, fearful, hopeless and all the other emotions that go with these actions/feelings. This leads to poverty, and even suicidal thoughts (where hope is absent, despair reigns). Crime also flourishes as people seek other means to fend for themselves.

Even if God revealed this to you in prayer, in a vision (prophetically) or however, and even if the threat was “real and credible” telling the people to “fear” is the wrong move. Even when God SPOKE to Moses that He would destroy the Children of Israel in the wilderness for being disobedient, please note, Moses did not rush to the Israelites to give them the ‘bad news’, he remonstrated with God, pleading, crying and reminding God His promises and the far they had come. God ‘had no choice’ but to relent!

I wish we would just remind one another that in the ‘real and credible threat’ of terrorism, please be vigilant; watch out for suspicious activities and people and earnestly PRAY to God to keep us safe. That way, we would pursue peace and safety and still go on with our lives while invoking God’s favour towards us.

Cowards die many times before their actual deaths. You can choose fear and sit and do nothing, or you can put your hope. faith and trust in the same God who says, “Do not fear or be dismayed, for I will strengthen you. These enemies you see today, you shall see them no more”!!! Hallelujah! No man dies twice. If it is your day, you can dig yourself a bunker and lock it, but death will still find you there!

Kenyans. Let us shun fear. Let us also become responsible; if you suspect something or someone, double-check! Our forefathers fought in the forests and may died in the process, so that we can be FREE. I choose Courage and Freedom in my country; I choose Faith in a Mighty God and not fear of satan and his forces. I will go on living my life the way I choose not the way some demented cowards would want me to live. And if I die in the process, praise be to God Most High. Either way, in war or in peacetime, one day, I will still die. Death is the last thing I fear!

“Where, O death, is your victory? Where, O death, is your sting?” The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God! He gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.” And then again, “For to me, to live is Christ and to die is gain.”

Get it? To die is GAIN!!! I am free. My country is free! “Where Christ is, there is liberty”.

I am free like that, and no devil will hold back my freedom!!! Be free, too …

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